Planetary Profiles: Vakkea

As with the Alien Anthropology posts, we’ll be continuing to build the background and lore of The Unity Wars‘ setting with the Planetary Profiles series.  They will also be linked to the History and Background page.

Planetary Overview

Vakkea is the fourth planet of ten orbiting the K-type orange dwarf D’zhikk.  A heavy-metal-rich world, Vakkea’s native ecosystem is limited to single-celled organisms up to something resembling giant lichens, which covers large swaths of the planet’s landmass.  Several landlocked seas dot the planet’s surface, though the total water coverage amounts to less than thirty percent of the planetary surface.

Early History

While it was initially discovered by the majority-ekuz Izh’hich Corporation, the news of a new habitable planet with plentiful—and valuable—minerals quickly sparked a bit of a rush from the nearby ekuz worlds within nearly a parsec.  For the first few years, the settlement of Vakkea was a bit of a free-for-all, though a mostly peaceful one.  There was enough territory on the planet’s surface for all comers to have plenty of room. Continue reading

Alien Anthropology – The Yeheri

In this latest installment of the Alien Anthropology series, we meet the yeheri.  These beings appear in the opening chapters of The Fall of Valdek.  As before, this post will be linked to the Alien Races page under History and Background.

Yeheri History

A cruiser from Enekosh made first contact with the yeheri.  Enekosh is a prosperous sefkhit world, known at the time for its idealism.  In large part due to this idealism, the cruiser’s captain was completely unprepared for what they encountered.

The Yaahaag system was split up between three major empires.  All three had been intermittently at war for over a century in Yaahaag reckoning.  (Yaahaag orbits its sun in roughly 7,400 hours.)  They had also expanded throughout their system, colonizing outer worlds and asteroids.  The wars between empires often flared up on and between those outer worlds and asteroids, even when uneasy peace reigned on the homeworld.

Without understanding the yeheri languages, or the dynamics of the three empires, the sefkhit made contact, seeking to make new friends and welcome a younger race into the loose galactic community.

Exactly what happened has never been adequately explained; the ship never returned to Enekosh, and the yeheri have never been forthcoming with the details.  But certain details have been determined by context and study.  The sefkhit cruiser made contact with the Kahapar Concordiat, the most militant and totalitarian of the three empires. Continue reading

Alien Anthropology: The Ekuz

This is the first of a series of posts that will dig deeper into the lore and background, to be later linked to the History and Background pages.  The Alien Anthropology posts will be linked directly to the Alien Races page.

Ekuz History

The ekuz diaspora began about three centuries after the human (by ekuz reckoning; their homeworld’s year is approximately 9,992 hours, as opposed to the 8,766 hours of the Terran standard used by most human historians).   The extent of ekuz worlds is still considerably smaller than the human worlds.  They are thickest through the Norma, Crux, and Carina arms of the galaxy.

According to some ekuz sources (though the veracity and details are in doubt in some circles), the diaspora started due to a looming interplanetary war in the ekuz home system.   (There are hundreds of different names and nearly as many guesses as to the homeworld’s location).  One or more of the factions, rather than risk a cataclysmic war that would have involved both nuclear and asteroid weapons, instead built sublight arks from hollowed-out asteroids and fled the system.  Some ekuz historians suggest that the tensions leading up to the war might even have been due to one or more factions observing the construction of the arks and believing them to be first-strike asteroid weapons.  No one really knows. Continue reading

What’s This All About?

What is The Unity Wars?

Well, it’s an upcoming series of science fiction adventures.  The best description so far is, “The Clone Wars crossed with The Horus Heresy, with influence from the Lensman series, Hammer’s Slammers, and Farscape.”

Confused yet?  Hopefully also curious and a little excited.

I fiddled around with writing science fiction  for several years before I became an action-adventure writer.  It was mostly Star Wars and Wing Commander flavored at the time.  I’ve always enjoyed science fiction, specifically what can often be described as “space opera,” adventures in deep space and on distant worlds.  And I’ve also always wanted to go back to it.

A few years ago (before Disney Star Wars, which we won’t go into), I got a wild hair and asked myself, “What if the Star Wars prequels were better-written?  What if the Clone Wars were more like what was hinted at in the earlier Expanded Universe?”  I started to scribble some notes, but it was ultimately doomed to go nowhere, since I have no desire to get sued into oblivion by Lucasfilm/Disney.

Then Galaxy’s Edge happened.

If you’re not familiar with Galaxy’s Edge, go take a look at www.galacticoutlaws.com.  Nick Cole has described it as StarWarsNotStarWars.  It uses many of the familiar tropes and technology of the Star Wars universe, but is still it’s own setting, its own story.  It is also awesome.  And so the gears started turning again, and I turned back to “Alt Clone Wars.”

I’ve always enjoyed Star Wars (though largely limited to the original trilogy, the X-Wing games, and a few of the novels, most notably Timothy Zahn’s Thrawn Trilogy).  But some things about it have always bugged me.  Why are all the starships either airplanes in space or naval vessels in space?  Sure, they look cool, but they don’t make much sense in space.  And the less said about the military aspects, the better.  (Clone troopers running at the enemy across open ground, firing from the hip…Bleh.)

Epic Science Fiction

So, I pulled out my old AltStarWars file and started tweaking it.  The end result is the beginnings of what promises to be a sprawling, galaxy-spanning science fiction epic.  There will be several intertwining arcs, aliens, vast fleets and armies, dark conspiracies, and all sorts of space opera goodness.  It’s not Star Wars, or Galaxy’s Edge.  It’s not LensmanThe Unity Wars is entirely its own story, in its own setting, and it will be going places that no one else has gone.

I hope you’ll join me for the ride.