Galactic History: The Evacuation of Keder M’ell

Origins

“Keder M’ell” was the name chosen by the mixed group of gordoks, feshen, and humans who fled the Kesterev System to the star designated 4477 Ravati.  Proponents of a splinter cult from the Church of the Universe Manifest, they had reportedly begun experimenting with certain mind-altering drugs in an attempt to communicate directly with “The Universe.”  Several of these drugs were banned by all three of the Kesterev governments, due to extremely dangerous—often lethal—side effects.  This led to clashes between the cultists and all three governments, leading to an eventual split in the cult between insurgents and those who desired simply to leave to conduct their experiments elsewhere.  The insurgents stayed.  The more “peaceable” fraction boarded starships and fled to the red dwarf designated 4477 Ravati.

They could not have picked a more unlikely system to attempt to colonize.  Red dwarf stars are notoriously unstable.  Of two planetary bodies orbiting 4477 Ravati, one was a red giant of sufficient mass to almost be classified as a brown dwarf.  The other, a terrestrial planet of 0.6 Earth masses which the cultists named Keder M’ell, was tidally locked to the red dwarf.  Its atmosphere was mostly sulfur dioxide, lethally poisonous to all three races.  But it was precisely that inhospitability that the cultists apparently found appealing.

For the first generation, Keder M’ell remained utterly unknown to anyone but the colonists, who huddled in their buried habs and attempted to find new ways to commune with the Universe.  At least half of them died in the first ten thousand hours, both from drug poisoning and from accidents.  None of them had truly been prepared for the rigors and dangers of their new home, and they paid the price for it. Continue reading

Galactic History: The Fall of the Triamic Hegemony

A Flawed Edifice

The Triamic Hegemony might have seemed strangely monolithic to outsiders, particularly in a galaxy where a government that even encompassed an entire planet was rare.  But beneath the surface, the unprecedented edifice of the Hegemony had deeper cracks than any aliens realized.

The Hegemony was ultimately built upon a stratified alliance of triamic packs.  It was the result of centuries of wars for territory and dominance, out of which the order of precedence of the packs within the Hegemony slowly and painfully emerged.  To some of the more idealistic aliens, the Hegemony seemed to be a dream come true, a truly interstellar civilization of a high order of technology and sociological sophistication.  But it was built upon a foundation of hundreds of triamic years of ferocious bloodshed.  And, as it turned out, that foundation was far shakier than believed, even by most of the triamic. Continue reading

Alien Anthropology: The Ekuz

This is the first of a series of posts that will dig deeper into the lore and background, to be later linked to the History and Background pages.  The Alien Anthropology posts will be linked directly to the Alien Races page.

Ekuz History

The ekuz diaspora began about three centuries after the human (by ekuz reckoning; their homeworld’s year is approximately 9,992 hours, as opposed to the 8,766 hours of the Terran standard used by most human historians).   The extent of ekuz worlds is still considerably smaller than the human worlds.  They are thickest through the Norma, Crux, and Carina arms of the galaxy.

According to some ekuz sources (though the veracity and details are in doubt in some circles), the diaspora started due to a looming interplanetary war in the ekuz home system.   (There are hundreds of different names and nearly as many guesses as to the homeworld’s location).  One or more of the factions, rather than risk a cataclysmic war that would have involved both nuclear and asteroid weapons, instead built sublight arks from hollowed-out asteroids and fled the system.  Some ekuz historians suggest that the tensions leading up to the war might even have been due to one or more factions observing the construction of the arks and believing them to be first-strike asteroid weapons.  No one really knows. Continue reading

The Unity Wars Versus The Standard Human Spaceship

STAR WARS introduced a standard of spaceship design.

And it’s a standard that really makes no sense.  The deck plans are parallel to the axis of thrust, leading to airplanes and seagoing ships in space.  Most of it came from a simple “rule of cool.”  George Lucas wanted to replicate old WWII gun camera footage for the trench run, as well as evoke old war movies, most notably The Bridges at Toko-Ri.  It was purely aesthetics.

But over time, it’s become a standard.  Granted, Star Trek does the same thing, I think largely as “Horatio Hornblower In Space.”  (Hornblower was an inspiration for Captain Kirk.)  All of the ships are glorified surface navy cruisers, even if they are styled like airplanes or flying saucers. Continue reading