The Military Brotherhoods – The Caractacan Brotherhood

Continuing the entries into the History and Background files, we present the first profile of one of the Military Brotherhoods to be found throughout the galaxy.

Origin

While definitely not the first of the Military Brotherhoods, the Caractacan Brotherhood is still among the oldest, and one of the most feared and respected.  Founded by Caractacus Regnus in the aftermath of the Elbianian Terror, the Brotherhood has grown over the centuries since then until there are Legions established across the Orion, Carina, and Crux Arms.

Caractacus was not only deeply affected by the horrors that the Elbianian cultists wreaked across a hundred star systems.  The chaos afterward was what really formed the Caractacan Brotherhood.  In the wake of the atrocities perpetrated by the Elbianians, entire systems descended into lawlessness, as so much of their infrastructure had been destroyed.  On many worlds, in many systems, the only law became strength and brute force.

Caractacus was a pious man as well as a superlative military commander.  Retiring from his post on Christopholis, he set out to found his own Military Brotherhood, based on a very specific set of principles. Continue reading

Planetary Profiles: Vakkea

As with the Alien Anthropology posts, we’ll be continuing to build the background and lore of The Unity Wars‘ setting with the Planetary Profiles series.  They will also be linked to the History and Background page.

Planetary Overview

Vakkea is the fourth planet of ten orbiting the K-type orange dwarf D’zhikk.  A heavy-metal-rich world, Vakkea’s native ecosystem is limited to single-celled organisms up to something resembling giant lichens, which covers large swaths of the planet’s landmass.  Several landlocked seas dot the planet’s surface, though the total water coverage amounts to less than thirty percent of the planetary surface.

Early History

While it was initially discovered by the majority-ekuz Izh’hich Corporation, the news of a new habitable planet with plentiful—and valuable—minerals quickly sparked a bit of a rush from the nearby ekuz worlds within nearly a parsec.  For the first few years, the settlement of Vakkea was a bit of a free-for-all, though a mostly peaceful one.  There was enough territory on the planet’s surface for all comers to have plenty of room. Continue reading

Building On #StarWarsNotStarWars

Star Wars Is Great

Lest anyone think that I don’t like Star Wars, given some of the earlier posts here, I have to make this point.  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  It’s why I have issues with some of the later entries in the franchise; I think that they don’t do justice to what Star Wars could be.  The Original Trilogy remain classics, and having just gone back and rewatched all three, back to back, they still hold up.  (Which is why I don’t care for the argument that, “Star Wars is full of plot holes anyway, so you’re dislike of later installments is invalid.”)  There’s an ever-expanding universe of new worlds, new aliens, new ships, and hints of a long history.

Star Wars is a huge source of inspiration for The Unity Wars.  Because when you watch the movies, there’s a lot that’s implied without being said.  And that stuff that’s implied lends huge opportunities for storytelling. Continue reading

The Unity Wars Versus The Standard Human Spaceship

STAR WARS introduced a standard of spaceship design.

And it’s a standard that really makes no sense.  The deck plans are parallel to the axis of thrust, leading to airplanes and seagoing ships in space.  Most of it came from a simple “rule of cool.”  George Lucas wanted to replicate old WWII gun camera footage for the trench run, as well as evoke old war movies, most notably The Bridges at Toko-Ri.  It was purely aesthetics.

But over time, it’s become a standard.  Granted, Star Trek does the same thing, I think largely as “Horatio Hornblower In Space.”  (Hornblower was an inspiration for Captain Kirk.)  All of the ships are glorified surface navy cruisers, even if they are styled like airplanes or flying saucers. Continue reading

Space Opera Needs A Sense Of Scale

Space Opera Needs To Be Big

This is a basic truism.  (And one that Star Wars really started to fail at with the prequels.)  You have an entire galaxy to play in.  There is no reason to keep things small.  George Lucas started going off the rails when his vast, sweeping space opera became about one small family and the same handful of planets.

The problem is more widespread than just Star Wars.  It’s enough of a problem in science fiction that there’s an entire TV Tropes page about it.  (Warning: time sink)  Some of the more recent space opera franchise films have been really, really bad about it. Continue reading